Easy-Peasy Peach Cream Pie

August. Is there a better month for eating? Not if you live in a part of the world where corn, beefsteak tomatoes, and peaches are available in abundance this time of year. Farmers markets and roadside stands are loaded with so much bright, beautiful produce you hardly need to actually cook anything.

easy peach pie

Of course fresh, juicy peaches are a satisfying dessert on their own, but it’s always a treat to taste them baked in a pie. My aunt has been making this peach cream pie for decades, and it never disappoints. It’s also easy, which is exactly how summer cooking should be. I promise you, this recipe is totally worth turning on the oven, even in this August heat.

easy peach cream pie

EASY-PEASY PEACH CREAM PIE
1 raw pie crust
6 fresh peaches, peeled and sliced
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 450°F

Place peach slices into the pie shell, cut side up. Combine remaining ingredients in a bowl and stir well. Pour mixture over peaches.

Bake at 450°F for 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 325°F and bake for 30 minutes.

Baking tips: If your peaches aren’t super fresh, briefly pour boiling water over them to loosen the skin. If there is too much liquid in your pie shell, use a measuring cup to carefully remove the excess. Bake the pie on a cookie sheet in case the filling overflows.

Help! Breastfeeding Has Turned Me Into A Baked Goods Addict

Let me start by stating that I’m very grateful that I can breastfeed my baby. I know that it doesn’t work for all mothers and babies for a variety of reasons, and I’m thankful that it has worked for me and my daughter. It’s been a wonderful bonding experience.

However, breastfeeding has turned me into a bottomless pit. I’m hungry all of the time. And of course I don’t crave kale and arugula. (Does anyone crave leafy greens?) I yearn for full-fat lattes and date squares. Salted chocolate chip cookies. Freshly-baked scones. Almond croissants. Carrot cake with cream cheese frosting. Homemade blueberry pie with French vanilla ice cream. I want it all! Right now!

I indulge in these cravings on a semi-regular basis because, well, it takes a lot of energy to feed a human baby! And because sometimes I’m just too exhausted to muster the willpower not to. Sure, breastfeeding burns a lot of calories–I’ve read anywhere from 200 to 800 calories per day (the Internet can be so reliable)-but in my experience it’s not quite enough to balance out the extra energy I’m consuming. It’s maddening to juggle two constant, conflicting desires: to (a) eat fattening baked goods with abandon and (b) fit back into my pre-pregnancy jeans. Yes, I want to have my seven-layer chocolate cake and eat it, too. It’s an exhausting and frustrating mental battle, and when I get tired and frustrated, y’know what I wanna to do? EAT BAKED GOODS!!

And so I do… and I enjoy every last bite!

Since I’ve got sweets on the mind, I thought I’d share this recipe for Hello Dollies–one of my all-time favourite comfort foods. I know I say a lot of recipes are super easy to make, but this one is downright rudimentary. You don’t even have to stir the ingredients together! They might not be the prettiest treats on Pinterest, but who cares how they look when they taste so ridiculously delicious?

1/4 cup butter
1 cup graham cracker crumbs

1 cup flaked coconut
1 cup chocolate chips
1 cup pecans, chopped (optional)
1 can sweetened condensed milk

Preheat oven to 325°F

Melt butter in 8″ x 8″ pan. Add graham cracker crumbs and press firmly into pan to create crust. Arrange remaining ingredients over crust in order given, without stirring or mixing. Bake for 30 minutes. Let cool in pan before cutting into squares.

Blogging, Babies & Butter Tarts

I’ve decided to start blogging again. Why? Because I missed it. Because why not. Because what else am I going to do while my baby naps. (Oh yeah–I had a daughter a couple of months ago! But more on that later. Probably.)

September means back to school for students and back to work for summer vacationers, and since I’m not going back to either of those things, I might as well go back to blogging. Right? Write.

A lot of stuff has happened in the past few months: Dave and I said goodbye to our carefree/child-free days of bar hopping and apartment dwelling in Toronto’s Trinity-Bellwoods neighbourhood and became home-owning, Rav 4-driving, diaper-changing, stroller-pushing east enders. Our new gig keeps us busy doing all sorts of things, like trying to stay ahead of a Mount Everest-sized pile of laundry, making our house feel like a home (I swear we’ll get window coverings soon!), and manipulating our facial muscles in ridiculous contortions in attempt to make our daughter smile. Sometimes it even works (proof below).

baby smiles

Things I haven’t been doing lately include, but are not limited to: baking and blogging. And bathing. Just kidding. I totally still bathe, although it’s been bumped down on the to do list these days. Taking care a human baby is hard work! But it’s impossible to complain about the job when your boss is so darned cute.

Anyway, here’s a Grandma Murphy-approved recipe for butter tarts. I thought these were the perfect treats for this post since our daughter’s due date was Canada Day (her actual birth date was July 2) and apparently butter tarts are considered a Canadian delicacy. Beware: they are sinfully delicious and almost too easy to make!

easy butter tart reicpe

Note: I used this pastry recipe for the tart shells, but store-bought ones work, too!

1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup corn syrup
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup butter
1 egg
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat oven to 425°F

Cover raisins with boiling water. Let stand 5 to 10 minutes. Drain water. Beat in egg, brown sugar and the remaining ingredients. Pour mixture into raw tart shells–do not overfill. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes. 

Valentine’s Day Brownies

They say that food is love, and this Valentine’s Day I’m expressing my love in the form of heart-shaped brownies.

heart-shaped brownie recipe

Of course, there’s no way cocoa and icing sugar can adequately express the deep love that I have for Dave: my husband, my valentine, my best friend. There’s no way I can pour the love that flows through my wild, beating heart into brownie batter. He’s already got my heart, so presenting him with a plate of heart-shaped brownies is just one of the small ways I can show him how much he means to me. A sugary way to say I love you.

brownies_multipleValentine’s Day is a time to celebrate all forms of love–not just the romantic kind, but the love from friends and family that makes life beautiful. While they might not have been heart-shaped, these brownies were a staple in my Grandma Murphy‘s house when my mom and her four sisters were growing up. They, too, were an expression an of my grandma’s love for her daughters–especially when she iced them with chocolate frosting!

Brownies:
1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup Crisco 
2 squares chocolate or 1/3 cup cocoa
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt 

1 cup sifted flour
1 cup walnuts 
2 teaspoons vanilla 

Preheat oven to 350°F. 

Melt the chocolate squares in a double-boiler. Cream together sugar and Crisco using an electric mixer. Add eggs and beat until light. Add flour and melted chocolate or cocoa. Stir in salt, nuts and vanilla. Pour mixture into a 9-inch square pan and bake for 20 minutes. 

Frosting:
2 cups icing sugar 
1/2 cup cocoa 
1/4 cup butter 
Dash salt 
1/4 cup boiling water 

Thoroughly mix first four ingredients in a medium bowl. Add hot water very slowly while beating until it reaches a “flowing” consistency, much like a ganache. 

Chocolate Mocha Torte

All of my Grandma Murphy‘s desserts are delicious, but some are popular than others. Take for example, the beloved chocolate mocha torte.

chocolate mocha cake recipeThis tall, dark and handsome dessert is practically a celebrity in my family. When I asked relatives to share their favorite of Grandma’s recipes, almost all of the replies included the mocha torte. With its layers of moist chocolate chiffon cake and creamy mocha frosting, it’s totally worthy of its superstar status.

For me, this cake is synonymous with celebrations. It’s been my favorite cake for as long as I can remember. Even as a kid, I liked the rich mocha flavor and it was often the highlight of my childhood birthday parties. My mom loves this cake, too. For years, my grandma made it for her on her birthday, and I can’t think of this dessert without imagining my mom blowing out candles, her bright smile spread across her beautiful face.

If you try this recipe, I hope your family loves it as much as mine does. Enjoy!

For the cake: 
3/4 cup boiling water
4 squares sweet or semi-sweet chocolate 
1 2/3 cups sifted cake flour*
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons instant coffee
2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
8 eggs, separated
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 

For the frosting: 
3 cups whipping cream, chilled
1 1/2 cups icing sugar
1/2 cup sifted unsweetened cocoa 
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons instant coffee 

Preheat oven to 350 F

Combine chocolate in boiling water. Microwave for 1 minute. Stir well and let cool. 

Sift flour, 1 1/4 cups sugar, coffee, baking powder, and salt into small mixer bowl. Make a well in the mixture and add oil, egg yolks, and chocolate. Beat well. 

Combine egg whites and cream of tartar and beat until frothy. Gradually beat in remaining 1/4 cup sugar until stiff peaks form. Fold in chocolate batter until well mixed. Bake in an angel food cake pan for 45 to 50 minutes. Upturn pan until cool. 

For the frosting, combine cream, sugar, cocoa, salt, and coffee. Refrigerate, covered, for 30 minutes. Beat mixture with electric beaters until stiff. 

Split cake into three layers and ice liberally. 

*Can substitute with all-purpose flour.

Lemon Meringue Pie

Lemon meringue pie reminds me of my dad. It was his favorite dessert, and he especially liked Grandma Murphy’s version, with its tart filling and fluffy mountain of meringue. My grandma often came over to our house for Sunday dinner when I was little, and she always brought dessert. My dad was most excited when he discovered a lemon meringue smiling up at him from under her plastic cake carrier.

meringue

I made lemon meringue pie for the first time last summer. As I rolled out the pastry, whipped the egg whites to soft peaks and mixed the lemon filling, all I could think of was my dad. I imagined that he was coming to visit, and that I was making this pie just for him. I took meticulous care with every step. I imagined that once the pie had cooled, I would cut him a slice. A giant wedge with a thick ribbon of lemon filling and heaps of meringue with stiff, golden peaks. Then I would cut myself a slice just like it. And we would sit at my kitchen table, the afternoon sun streaming through the back windows, and shoot the breeze and eat pie, savoring every perfect bite, savoring the moment itself, because isn’t it wonderful to be alive.

lemon meringue pie My dad would be 62 years old today. It’s hard to imagine how he might have changed in the past 16 years. Would his hair and beard be completely gray? Would you be able to count more lines around his eyes when he smiled? Would he still blare his favorite records when no else was home and he had the house all to himself?

It’s funny, I didn’t actually like lemon meringue pie when I was a kid (fruit-based desserts were seriously sub-par to chocolate ones at the time), but I’ve grown to love it, and will continue to make it for special occasions, and just-because ones, in memory of my dad.

lemon meringue pie1 pie crust
1 box Shirriff’s lemon pie filling*
3 egg whites
6 tablespoons sugar

Preheat oven to 425°F

Prepare pie crust and bake according to recipe instructions. Blind bake raw pie shell for 10 to 12 minutes. My grandma often pre-bakes her pie shell the day before filling it, so that it’s completely cooled.

Preheat oven to 350°F

Prepare the Shirriff’s lemon pie filling according to directions on the box and add to cooled crust.

Beat egg whites until frothy. Gradually add the sugar, one tablespoon at a time, until mixture is very firm; standing peaks should form when you remove the beaters. Spread over filling, arranging meringue in attractive peaks. Bake until golden, about 10 to 12 minutes.

I was surprised that my grandma, who makes everything from scratch, uses (gasp!) store-bought filling for this recipe. “There’s no point going to the fuss of making it yourself because Shirriff’s lemon pie filling is so good,” Grandma says. Who can argue with that?!

Grandma Murphy’s Pantry: A Cookbook Made With Love

I was sitting at the kitchen table sometime in February, jotting down a grocery list when it hit me: I should make a cookbook of my Grandma Murphy’s baking recipes.

Grandma Murphy & KateMy mom’s mom, Mary Murphy, has fed the hearts and bellies of three generations of Murphys with her fabulous cakes, pies, cookies and squares. She started cooking and baking when she and my grandpa, Jack Murphy, got married in 1943, which means she’s been baking for 70 years. She’s 91 years old now, so she’s not baking as often as she did when she was raising her five daughters, but she still makes muffins and the occasional pie (with homemade pastry, of course) or chiffon layer cake. Which is pretty mind-blowing if you ask me.

So, anyway, I got the idea to write, edit and photograph a collection of her recipes and set about making it happen. I ran the idea by my grandma and the next thing I knew, I was on the train to Windsor to spend the weekend with her, gather the recipes and record her stories about baking, family, life and love.

whiteicing_15_instagramThe recipes in this book are comfort food at its best: delicious, not-too-fussy treats that have been passed on from one generation of our family to the next. We each have our favourites, and we all have memories associated with these baked goods. For me, shortbread cookies conjure the warmth of family gatherings at Christmastime. I can’t look at a mocha torte without imagining my mother, Kathie, blowing out birthday candles. Those flaky tea biscuits will forever remind me of the time Grandma taught my brother, Colin, my cousin Julie and me how to make them, each of us eager for a turn to roll out the dough. And it’s impossible for me to make lemon meringue pie without remembering my dad, Harry, who loved the tangy tart.

I finished the book in September and had the pleasure of delivering the final product, Grandma Murphy’s Pantry, to my grandma in October. The cookbook also includes recipes from my mom and her sisters, who are all whizzes in the kitchen and inherited Grandma’s love of cooking, baking and feeding the people they love. Over the next couple of months I’ll be updating this blog with recipes, photos and stories from the book — because recipes this good are too tasty not to share.